Sponsoring Programs

CGIAR Research Program on Grain Legumes
The CGIAR Research Program on Grain Legumes is a collaborative ten‐year research program that focuses on improving chickpea, cowpea, common bean, faba bean, groundnut, lentil, pigeonpea, and soybean crops grown by poor smallholder families in five target regions to combat poverty, hunger, malnutrition and environmental degradation. The program is a global research for development collaboration involving scientists at four member institutions of the CGIAR Consortium with the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi‐Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) as the lead center along with the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), and the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) along with several public and private institutes and organizations, governments, and farmers worldwide.

Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Grain Legumes T
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Grain Legumes is a research and institutional capacity strengthening program (2007–2017) funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and administered by Michigan State University. The program contributes to economic growth and food and nutrition security through knowledge and technology generation that strengthens grain legume (e.g., bean, cowpea, etc.) value chains in developing countries of Africa and Latin America. To achieve its objectives, the program supports multidisciplinary collaborative research between U.S. universities, National Agriculture Research Organizations (NAROs), agriculture universities, and the CGIAR in twelve USAID Feed the Future focus countries in Sub‐Saharan Africa and Latin America. 

Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Peanut Productivity and Mycotoxin Control
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Peanut Productivity and Mycotoxin Control is supported by USAID and administered by the University of Georgia. The mission of the PMIL is to apply leading innovative U.S. science to improve peanut (groundnut) production and to improve food safety by mitigating the negative impacts of contamination of peanut and other crops from toxins produced by soil‐borne fungal pathogens (mycotoxins) in developing countries. PMIL collaborative research and institutional strengthening projects are focused in five Feed the Future countries: Ghana, Haiti, Malawi, Mozambique, and Zambia.